N E W S

STAY INFORMED

February 2021

 

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

COVID-19 Vaccines at Work: Can My Employer Mandate?
For many people, whether to vaccinate will be their own choice. But can an employer insist that an employee get the COVID-19 vaccine?
Attorney Jessica C. Caggiano shares updates on the latest guidance from federal regulators including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).


Are Mandatory Security Screenings Compensable Under PA Law?
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court soon will decide whether screenings required before or after a work shift are compensable under Pennsylvania law, in a case called Heimbach v. Amazon.com, Inc. and Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc.
Attorney Ryan Allen Hancock explores the types of screenings that employees may be required to undergo and explains why the outcome of this case may have an important impact on workers' wages.


Interim NLRB General Counsel Moves Quickly to Re-Focus Agency on Workers' Rights
Five days after the ouster of Trump-appointed General Counsel Peter Robb, the Biden administration appointed NLRB career staffer Peter Sung Ohr as the new acting general counsel. Ohr has moved quickly to rescind several of Robb's key anti-worker initiatives, reaffirming the agency's commitment to encourage collective bargaining and support workers' rights. Attorney Joseph Richardson explains what changes Ohr has made and what might happen next.

Biden's Pro-Worker Agenda in Action
Within one week of taking office, President Joe Biden's administration has taken sweeping action that centers on and benefits working people. Specifically, the Biden administration has taken direct action with regard to wages, worker protections, and union organizing. Learn what moves have already been made and how they benefit working people.



Department Of Health Launches “Your Turn” Vaccine Eligibility Tool To Aid In Vaccination Process Across Commonwealth
1-877-PA-HEALTH Available To Answer Questions, Provide Help

“Since all seniors are currently eligible to be vaccinated, Pennsylvanians younger than 65 can use this tool to determine if it is their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Pennsylvania,” Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam said. “When it is your turn, we will direct you on how to find a vaccine provider. If it is not your turn yet, you will be able to enter contact information to receive updates about vaccine distribution in Pennsylvania and for us to let you know when it is your turn to get vaccinated.


TAKE A SELF ASSESSMENT


SYMPTOMS:


COVID-19 affects different people in different ways. Infected people have had a wide range of symptoms reported – from mild symptoms to severe illness.

Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

Fever or chills

Cough

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Fatigue

Muscle or body aches

Headache

New loss of taste or smell

Sore throat

Congestion or runny nose

Nausea or vomiting

Diarrhea


Look for emergency warning signs for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

Trouble breathing

Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

New confusion

Inability to wake or stay awake

Bluish lips or face


PREVENTION


The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Learn how COVID-19 spreads and practice these actions to help prevent the spread of this illness.

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19:

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around people who don’t live with you. Masks work best when everyone wears one.

Stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arm lengths) from others.

Avoid crowds. The more people you are in contact with, the more likely you are to be exposed to COVID-19.

Avoid unventilated indoor spaces. If indoors, bring in fresh air by opening windows and doors.

Clean your hands often, either with soap and water for 20 seconds or a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Get vaccinated against COVID-19 when it’s your turn.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily.



People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved one drug, remdesivir (Veklury), to treat COVID-19 in certain situations. cdc.gov


Self care

If you have possible or confirmed COVID-19:

Stay home except to get medical care.

Monitor your symptoms carefully. If your symptoms get worse, call your healthcare provider immediately.

Get rest and stay hydrated. Take over-the-counter medicines, such as acetaminophen, to help you feel better.

If you have a medical appointment, notify your healthcare provider ahead of time that you have or may have COVID-19.

Stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. If possible, use a separate bathroom. If you must be around others, wear a mask.


Medical treatments

Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care.

Your local health authorities may give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved one drug, remdesivir (Veklury), to treat COVID-19.

Any treatments that are used for COVID-19 should be taken under the care of a healthcare provider.

If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

Trouble breathing

Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

New confusion

Inability to wake or stay awake

Bluish lips or face




For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.